Research Associate in Forced Response of Aero-Engine Fan Blades

Imperial College London Department of Mechanical Engineering

Job summary

The Dynamics and Vibration UTC group are looking to hire a researcher to investigate the forced responsory of aero-engine fan blades. ­Aero-engine fan mechanical forcing occurs when the fan is operated in a non-uniform flowfield, such as during a take-off in crosswind. The forcing can be a function of small features in the flow, eg. the ground vortex. Additionally, the inlet flow is a function of the wider atmospheric turbulence - which...

Job listing information

  • Reference ENG01448
  • Date posted 11 November 2020
  • Closing date 10 December 2020

Key information about the role

  • Location South Kensington Campus (map)
  • Position type Full time, fixed term
  • Salary £35,477 – £47,579 plus benefits
  • Department Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Category Researcher / Non Clinical Researcher

Job description

Job summary

The Dynamics and Vibration UTC group are looking to hire a researcher to investigate the forced responsory of aero-engine fan blades. ­Aero-engine fan mechanical forcing occurs when the fan is operated in a non-uniform flowfield, such as during a take-off in crosswind. The forcing can be a function of small features in the flow, eg. the ground vortex. Additionally, the inlet flow is a function of the wider atmospheric turbulence - which varies with time - and this is important because what matters to the fan is not the time-mean stress but the peak stress. 

This project is funded by Innovate UK and works in collaboration with Industry and other universities. The aim of this project is for prediction capability to be able to capture both the steady and unsteady forcing levels experienced by a fanset. The expected approach will be to introduce an unsteady distortion plane type prediction within the rotor domain, and to validate this against engine test data

Duties and responsibilities

You will investigate the sensitivity of fan forcing amplitudes to unsteady distortions in the intake, and to develop a prediction method and capability so that the type of environmental flows that affect forced response amplitudes can be better understood. The activity will include validation of new methods by comparing to experimental data.

This will be followed by development of a methodology and prediction capability to be applied within engine development programs.

Essential requirements

    • ­Applicants are required to have, or be close to completing, a PhD in Mechanical Engineering or other related discipline.
    • You must have experience in unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity
    • You should also have knowledge of turbomachinery and computational fluid dynamics

Further information

This is a fixed term position until March 2023 in the first instance.

Candidates who have not yet been officially awarded their PhD will be appointed as a Research Assistant within the salary range £35,477 - £38,566 per annum.

Queries relating to the position should be directed to Dr Sina Stapelfeldt at s.stapelfeldt@imperial.ac.uk.

Our preferred method of application is via our website. Please click “APPLY NOW” to go through to the online application form. Should you have any queries regarding the application process please contact Miss Helen Stoneham at h.stoneham@imperial.ac.uk.

For technical issues when applying online please email recruitment@imperial.ac.uk Please ensure that you include the job reference number in any correspondence.

Committed to equality and valuing diversity, we are an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Disability Confident Employer and work in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people.

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